Got this from T Harv Eker’s newsletter today and thought I would like to share with you.

Many of us who are into attracting wealth sometimes forget this too. That while we go about our day to day, doing our best to become financially independent, we focus too much on “Our efforts to generate our returns” rather than “Asking and then receiving”. Not to sound too religious about asking, there is a force in the universe that gets moving when we ask.

The next step (in my opinion) after asking, is to be open to receiving. Receive well my friend.

Wealth File #10:

Rich people are excellent receivers.
Poor people are poor receivers.

If I had to nail down the number one reason most people do not reach their financial potential, it would be this: most people are poor ‘receivers’. They may or may not be good at giving, but they are definitely bad at receiving. And because they are bad at receiving, they don’t receive!

The main reason people are challenged by receiving is that they feel unworthy or undeserving. This syndrome runs rampant through our society. I would guess that over 90 percent of individuals have feelings of not being good.

The reality is, if you think you’re worthy, you are. If you think you’re not worthy, you’re not. Either way, you will live into your story!

To your success.

2 Responses to “Are you a good receiver?”

  1. Andrew Choong says:

    I read through T Harv Eker book and he has a lot of valid points. Attracting wealth or not really depends on what we want and what our desires are. Especially in Singapore, we are so used to depending on the government that we lose our desire to achieve our own success and be ready to receive the wealth that comes along with success.

    Sometimes, I feel it is not that people feel that they do not deserve or unworthy to receive, but maybe we are so dependent that we cannot identify what we want to receive or what we perceive as our “needs”.

  2. OysTeR says:

    <Sometimes, I feel it is not that people feel that they do not deserve or unworthy to receive, but maybe we are so dependent that we cannot identify what we want to receive or what we perceive as our “needs”.>

    Well said Andrew! I have the same sentiments too. In counselling, we call that co-dependency. Where people get confused between “Taking responsibility for one’s own life” vs “Expecting someone else to give them what they need”. It creates a very manipulative relationship, which is what we see prevalent in Singapore culture today.

    My hope then for Singapore is for people to reclaim that ‘responsibility’ so that they can start on the journey towards personal freedom.

    Have a good day my friend.

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